Great Festival event – Evesham

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What a lovely group of people at the Evesham Festival of Words, 2017. When a writer attends an event at an unfamiliar venue there are always some nerves jangling. Will they be a friendly lot? Welcoming smiles or fiercely crossed arms and legs? Will there be ANYONE?
I need have had no such concerns for this Evesham Festival – a great variety of events held in a truly friendly atmosphere. I was fortunate enough to be invited to attend the Festival Bookshop launch in the Almonry (a superb historical building in the centre of the town, once a 14th Century home to the Almoner of the Benedictine Abbey that was founded at Evesham in the 8th Century) where I read from my first DCI Matt Proctor novel “Too Smart to Die” to a packed audience.
Festival Chair Sue Ablett and her excellent team devised a varied programme of authors reading from their works, namely; Andrea Darby, Sue Johnson, James Bacon, Hilary Orme, Paige Elizabeth Turner/aka Nigel Barnard, Pershore Young writers and yours truly; readings well chaired by Ashleigh Jayes.
Afterwards, writers and attendees mingled and chatted over nibbles and drinks – and took the opportunity to buy signed copies of books and tickets for other festival event. (I’m sure a few dads and mums were ‘persuaded’ by teenage offspring to buy my book when they heard me refer to ‘cybercrime’!).
A most enjoyable experience – this writer for one will definitely be back next year.

 

 

 

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Join me and other writers at the Evesham Festival of Words Bookshop Launch, Friday 16th June 7pm.

Following the success of last year’s event, join us again for the launch of the festival bookshop here at the Almonry.  Meet and hear extracts read by our bookshop authors and buy a copy of your favourites. Books will be on sale at the Almonry until 15th July. Free evening event.

‘NO WAY OUT’

The latest Birmingham cop DCI Matt Proctor crime thriller out soon. Hear Tom Bryson read from his new, fast-paced novel – the third in the Matt Proctor series.

DSC01764“Trapped in their own minds they must follow cult leader Gabriel Omoto – but to where and what? What “evil things” terrify young cult member Adele so much she won’t dare speak of them?

Cop Matt Proctor also has problems in his mind – he needs to get out of a rut and take on a big new challenge. Is he up to it? Or is the price too high?

Then there’s his spirited daughter Sarah to contend with – a young woman with a mind of her own, maybe too much a “chip off the old block”.

A fast-paced crime thriller with many twists and turns and a gripping climax.

The third novel in the DCI Matt Proctor series works as a stand-alone crime thriller.

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Libraries – we need them.

Support your local community library.

Read to see

In many parts of the UK cash-strapped local authorities have to make drastic cuts in services to save money. My own local library, Kinver, since the beginning of this year (2017) is staffed entirely by volunteers. We owe a debt of gratitude to them – by their efforts we continue to have a library that provides such an essential service to young and old (and those in-between!) and serves as a community hub.

To support the library, I have agreed to give a free session in the form of a talk/workshop on ‘Writing and Publishing your Book’. This may be followed by support sessions for those who want to pursue writing their book. Here’s my press release.

Writing and Publishing know-how for budding authors”

What do you want to write?

  • Memoir 
  • Novel
  • Short stories anthology
  • Poetry collection
  • Children’s story

Local Kinver crime and thriller writer, Tom Bryson, will explain how would-be authors can write and publish their own books at minimal cost. His talk at Kinver Community Library is on Thursday, 9th March at 7.30 pm.

He says, ‘Ever thought of writing your personal or family memoir – not an autobiography but a ‘slices of life’ story? Sometimes we leave it too late to ask our parents, grandparents about their lives and times. All too soon we’ve lost them and then regret missed opportunities to have known so much more. So how about writing your book for posterity – for your family and descendants. Without getting too pretentious, this could be your much-treasured legacy.

‘Or what about that novel you’ve had at the back of your mind for years – perhaps there’s a draft gathering dust in a drawer somewhere. Why not dig it out, rewrite it in the best way you can, find a good editor and see your book in print and as an e-book.

‘Perhaps you have an idea for a children’s book, or a collection of short stories or poems you want to produce in an anthology. All are possible.

‘Won’t all this cost a fortune? Not necessarily, given the advent of digital technology and print-on-demand publishing. The days are gone when you needed to buy a shedful of books to get an economic print run and then traipse the shops and streets to sell them. If you’re prepared to take the learning curve and get to grips with word processing and formatting for internet uploads, you can do it. (Or perhaps there’s a fourteen year old you can collar to help!). If you must incur costs, then a good editor is the most important investment to make.’

Local Kinver author Tom Bryson, who writes crime and thriller novels, will reveal all at the recently launched Kinver Community Library on Thursday, 9th March, 7.30pm, tickets from the library, £2. (All proceeds go the the Community library)

So – dream your dream – come along and hear what Tom has to say.

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Website https://tombrysonwriter.wordpress.com

Books available from amazon here (print and e-book) and author (email tombryson1@yahoo.com  Tel. 01384 872204)


 

Writing a novel

WRITING A NOVEL

4. SCENES

A quick recap.

I’ve already written blogs covering three of ‘Seven Components of Novel Writing’. Below is the fourth. Here’s the FULL list:

  1. CORE– Who is the Main Character, what’s their goal, problem, obstacles, what are the stakes for failure? In 50 words; yes, I keep this to 50 words. Concentrates the mind!
  2. OUTLINE– Two pages max. Written in present tense, with a start, middle and end. Split into key scenes with short headings. Leave room for the story to evolve.
  3. MAIN PLOT– Spine of the story, the heart of the MC’s journey. Sub-plots add complexity and richness. The main plot (and sub-plots) summaries need only be a sentence or two.
  4. SCENES– Scenes are the building blocks of the novel. These are where the action is. As you write scenes you are writing your book.
  5. CHARACTERS– Absolutely critical. The reader must care about these people.
  6. SETTINGS– Give ‘colour’, atmosphere, they complement characterisation, add credibility and context whether real or fictional places.
  7. SYNOPSIS – Comes at the end because a synopsis is a ‘selling’ tool; your book summary. You write a synopsis when you’ve finished your book. (I include it as part of planning because you’ll need it for submissions).

 

SCENES

In this FOURTH  blog in the series, I’ll focus on my fourth COMPONENT in WRITING A NOVEL, namely writing SCENES. 

 

What is a scene?  

Scenes are the building blocks of the novel. These are where the action is. As you write scenes you are writing your book.

I find that I need a scene plan to give me prompts to flesh out the scene. When I am writing the scene I follow the plan but not as if it were a ‘tablet of stone’ – no, I let the writing flow and don’t permit the plan to be a strait-jacket, more a rough track that becomes a defined path as the writing progresses. To give completeness to a scene I use a checklist – I call it my ‘Easyview Scene Planner’. Here it is and I’ll go through how it works.

I write my first draft using Microsoft One Note – it’s free and having experimented with other writing tools including Scrivener – a great tool by the way that many writers swear by- but one I found over-complicated. (I’m a simple soul who likes things simple).

 

EASYVIEW SCENE PLANNER (Enter here brief scene description, scene number, word count)

FOR EACH SCENES ASK; WRITE THIS SCENE PLAN BELOW – REVISE DURING WRITING
Why? PURPOSE: Show viewpoint character – who? Chasing goal which is?
What? ACTION: Through the main plot/sub-plots? Which in this scene are?
Who? VIEWPOINT CHARACTER is? Show traits, develop character. Other characters?
How? CONFLICT: What are the Internal/External obstacles to the main character’s goal?
Where? SETTING: Where are we? Define early in scene. Create atmosphere?
When? TIMELINE: Day, night, season, time since last scene?? Define early
Hook HOOK: Why read on? Entice, intrigue, engage  – dazzle reader
 

 

 

KEEP WRITING FOCUS ON:

·        PROTAGONIST’S PROBLEMS, FIGHTING OBSTACLES AND FINAL GOAL

·        Use external action-character reaction units (instinctive, dilemma, decision)

·        Use active verbs, min adverbs/adjectives, pace sentences, concrete not abstract words use senses, show-don’t tell, eke info, intrigue, balance action/description/dialogue.

·        Use the senses, sight, sound, taste, touch, smell

·        Explore emotions – anger, fear, elation, sadness, love,hate, disgust, happiness, etc.

 

I fully expect some will say this is far too detailed and will inhibit creativity. I understand that view although I think this grid can be adapted and modified to suit individual tastes.

I tried a few more basic approaches such as this: it works.


Scene heading:  


Viewpoint character


Goal, obstacles, conflict?


What happens?


Using this tool, I can write a scene plan in a couple of minutes – I don’t write a plan for every scene at the outset, but get the key scenes planned and written first, then fill in the rest. My key scenes are the opening scene, the inciting incident or ‘spark’ that gets the story going, turning points where the main character hits the buffers and has to change tack, tough it out, tastes success, faces despair, and of course the climax – where good triumphs over evil – or maybe vice versa!

Here’s the scene plan for the opening scene in my cop Matt Proctor novel ‘IN IT FOR THE MONEY’. (See below)

EASYVIEW SCENE PLANNER

  1. 1. Bookmaker Harry McGeady’s murder in Birmingham betting shop

 

FOR EACH SCENES ASK; WRITE THIS SCENE PLAN BELOW – REVISE DURING WRITING
Why? PURPOSE: Show viewpoint character – who? Chasing goal which is? Grab attention, introduce cop Matt Proctor (likes a bet), start spine story, introduce problem for MP (McGeady’s murder), set tone, atmosphere.
What? ACTION: Through the main plot/sub-plots? Which in this scene are? Proctor collects winning bet, shop raided, cash handed over to two  balacala’d bikers, McGeady shot dead in face.

Senses: Red blood, salty, loud gunshot, tv blast, bike roars, cigarette smells,  p/mint gum, sphincter gone, cold floor, hot outside

Who? VIEWPOINT CHARACTER is? Show traits, develop character. Other characters?  DCI Matt Proctor
How? CONFLICT: What are the Internal/External obstacles to the main character’s goal? MP versus  gang, MP versus teller, MP v ‘demons’
Where? SETTING: Where are we? Define early in scene. Create atmosphere? Int. bookies, tv’s on, newspapers on wall, tinny speakers, tawdry
When? TIMELINE: Day, night, season, time since last scene?? Define early  June, summer, hot and sunny
Hook HOOK: Why read on? Entice, intrigue, engage  – dazzle reader MP’s good mood shattered, jolted, injured, angry, his snout murdered.
KEEP WRITING FOCUS ON:

·        PROTAGONIST’S PROBLEMS, FIGHTING OBSTACLES AND FINAL GOAL

·        Use external action-character reaction units (instinctive, dilemma, decision)

·        Use active verbs, min adverbs/adjectives, pace sentences, concrete not abstract words use senses, show-don’t tell, eke info, intrigue, balance action/description/dialogue.

·        Use the senses, sight, sound, taste, touch, smell

·        Explore emotions – anger, fear, elation, sadness, love,hate, disgust, happiness, etc.

 

I intend pulling these blogs together into a compact ‘how-to’ book provisionally called ‘The Quick Novel Writer’ and publish it later this year – possibly as a free giveaway. Website header collage straightPicMonkeyThanks and keep looking in, folks!

We’re talking murder…

Organisations/Writing/Readers’ groups

Next at Coventry Phoenix Rotary Club on Wednesday 30th November, 2016, 7.30 pm. Rotarians welcome.

DEAD keen on crime/thriller stories?

Talk by local crime and thriller writer

TOM BRYSON

 

For readers, for writers, for Rotarians!

 cropped-cover-money-fuzzy-6.jpgCrime writer Tom Bryson

In new DCI MATT PROCTOR crime series novel ‘IN IT FOR THE MONEY’,  Brum/Black Country cop  Proctor investigates murder, match and spot fixing – and he needs to ‘fix’ his personal life!